SEYMOUR BOG STANDARD BEST BITTER

Post & comment on beer, cider & mead recipes

Moderator: rsc3da

SEYMOUR BOG STANDARD BEST BITTER

Postby seymour » Wed Dec 17, 2014 10:49 am

This is a tasty and authentic English Ale recipe I brew as-is, or use as a base-line for hop trials, increase hops for an IPA, increase maltbill or reduce water to brew an ESB, etc. I sometimes add 3-5% unmalted grain (torrified wheat, flaked barley, steel-cut oats, etc) to improve the mouthfeel, head retention and lace. You can substitute flaked corn or white sugar to lighten the colour and body.

The possibilities are endless. It is especially great cask-conditioned and/or dispensed via beer engine.

SEYMOUR BOG STANDARD BEST BITTER
6 US gallons = 5 Imperial gallons = 22.7 Liters

GRAINBILL
83% = 7.47 lbs = 3388 g, UK Pale Malt (Maris Otter, Golden Promise, Pauls Mild Malt, etc.)
10% = .9 lb = 408 g, UK Crystal Malt (light or dark, as you prefer)
2% = .18 lb = 82 g, UK Amber Malt
5% = .45 lb = 204 g, Molasses (or Treacle, Dark Invert Syrup, Brewers Caramel, Dark Brown Sugar, etc)
TOTAL: 9 lbs = 4.08 kg

MASH at 150°F/65.6°C for 60 min, optional: stir-in a pinch of Calcium Carbonate

SPARGE to collect 6.5 US gallons/5.4 Imperial gallons/24.6 L pre-boil

BOIL 60 min, add Molasses at this time, optional: a pinch of gypsum to make hops pop

HOPS
1.2 oz = 21 g, East Kent Goldings, First Wort Hops
.6 oz = 21 g, East Kent Goldings, 15 min remaining (add Irish Moss at this time as well)

YEAST
Ringwood Brewery dual-strain
, or the complex, high-attenuating English ale yeast of your choice

STATS
OG: 1043
FG: 1010
ABV: 4.3%
IBU: 30
Colour: clear orange amber
Last edited by seymour on Fri Dec 19, 2014 7:52 am, edited 1 time in total.
User avatar
seymour
 
Posts: 148
Joined: Thu May 15, 2014 1:24 pm
Location: Maplewood, Missouri, USA

Re: SEYMOUR BOG STANDARD BEST BITTER

Postby siwelwerd » Wed Dec 17, 2014 12:46 pm

seymour wrote:MASH at 150°F/65.6°C for 60 min, optional: stir-in a pinch of Calcium Carbonate


Three questions: First, since you converted everything else from metric to imperial, how much is a "pinch" in imperial? What water are you starting with? And what are you hoping to get from the added carbonate in this beer?
User avatar
siwelwerd
 
Posts: 936
Joined: Tue Jun 10, 2008 6:38 pm
Location: Tuscaloosa, AL

Re: SEYMOUR BOG STANDARD BEST BITTER

Postby seymour » Wed Dec 17, 2014 2:29 pm

siwelwerd wrote:
seymour wrote:MASH at 150°F/65.6°C for 60 min, optional: stir-in a pinch of Calcium Carbonate


Three questions: First, since you converted everything else from metric to imperial, how much is a "pinch" in imperial? What water are you starting with? And what are you hoping to get from the added carbonate in this beer?

Good questions. I say "pinch" and "optional" in order to be intentionally vague. I realize what a tricky science water chemisty is, and that every single brewer starts-out with different water.

Living in St. Louis, I am blessed with very usable brewing water as-is. I often add a little chalk (Calcium carbonate) for natural hardness which can beneficially amend mash pH in amber and dark grists, contributes a vague Old-World limestone well-water mystique, and the hardness breaks-down during the boil anyway. But as with all water additions, there is no one-size-fits-all recommendation. Just a dab'll do ya'...your mileage may vary...feel free to disregard entirely...

I will say this: when done carefully, it adds a nice layer of complexity to these English ales not otherwise present when using plain ol' tapwater. And if you combine with my other intentionally vague gypsum tip (an English brewing "one-two punch," if you will) that more-or-less restores the original pH and amplifies the English hops' singing voice over the top of a great mineral-water mouthfeel.
User avatar
seymour
 
Posts: 148
Joined: Thu May 15, 2014 1:24 pm
Location: Maplewood, Missouri, USA

Re: SEYMOUR BOG STANDARD BEST BITTER

Postby jeffjm » Wed Dec 17, 2014 5:48 pm

I'd recommend against adding the calcium carbonate. I used to add it too but have since learned it's not a great idea. For one thing, unless there's a lot of carbon dioxide present, it is not very soluble in water. For another (there's a whole section in the water book on this) chalk doesn't do a great job of raising alkalinity even if you can get it in solution. It's inefficient (not much alkalinity gained compared to the amount of chalk added) and the reaction is very slow.

I'm not sure how much a 'pinch' is, but if it's too big you could end up with a chalky taste and mouthfeel. I've made some disappointing dry stouts this way.

The better option, if you have water that's low in sodium and want to increase alkalinity, is baking soda (sodium bicarbonate). For my water (south county, Meramec plant) about half a gram per gallon seems about right. You want to make sure sodium is under 100 PPM (I've heard others say 50PPM), so there's an upper limit on how much you can add.
I set out running but I take my time.
User avatar
jeffjm
 
Posts: 383
Joined: Sun Feb 26, 2012 5:16 pm
Location: Crestwood

Re: SEYMOUR BOG STANDARD BEST BITTER

Postby rsc3da » Mon Mar 09, 2015 9:16 pm

I don't use calcium carbonate either for the same reasons. I used to use it when I started out brewing but I found it wasn't all that effective so I stopped using it. I have used baking soda and it works well, but just keep in mind it adds sodium. Sodium can help bring out all the flavors a bit at low to moderate levels but it will start to make your beer taste salty if you add too much of it and often water coming out of your tap already has some sodium in it. I'd recommend trying out pickling lime if you haven't, it's extremely effective at raising the pH of the mash and it also contributes calcium which is necessary for yeast metabolism, clarity of the wort and finished beer and also the stability of the finished beer. I would say calcium is probably the most important ion that you need to have in your brewing water. I've seen pickling lime around town, usually in canning foods sections of stores.
Kegged: CAH (Cider + Agave + Honey)
Lagering: -
Conditioning: RIS (BA Abraxas 2.0),Quad/Saison
Fermenting: Oktoberfest, Lambic
Plan: -
rsc3da
 
Posts: 224
Joined: Mon Mar 19, 2012 8:36 pm
Location: St. Peters MO

Re: SEYMOUR BOG STANDARD BEST BITTER

Postby jeffjm » Tue Mar 10, 2015 12:45 pm

Thanks, Ryan, I had forgotten about pickling lime. I looked into it once and decided it was too complicated, and since there's very little sodium in my source water I decided I'd be better off using something I understood :D

Somewhat counterintuitively, lime can be used to REDUCE alkalinity: http://braukaiser.com/wiki/index.php?ti ... laked_lime. I don't have the chemistry to understand half of what it says, which also led to my reluctance to use pickling lime (which I'm reasonably sure is the same thing as slaked lime - they are both calcium hydroxide).

Anyway, since your post, I did a bit more reading and googling and think I get the gist of using pickling lime to add alkalinity. The important thing I found was this, from Martin Brungard https://sites.google.com/site/brunwater/water-knowledge

Although pickling lime supplies hydroxyl ions to water, the hydroxyl content can be presented as a corresponding bicarbonate concentration for use in brewing calculations. A problem with pickling lime is its purity. It will degrade into chalk when exposed to moisture in the air. Therefore, pickling lime may not always produce the intended degree of alkalinity. For a pickling lime addition of 1 gram per gallon, the bicarbonate content of the water is increased by about 435 ppm.


435ppm is huge - that's over twice the bicarbonate contributed by baking soda. Ryan, how precisely do you measure lime?
I set out running but I take my time.
User avatar
jeffjm
 
Posts: 383
Joined: Sun Feb 26, 2012 5:16 pm
Location: Crestwood

Re: SEYMOUR BOG STANDARD BEST BITTER

Postby rsc3da » Fri Mar 13, 2015 1:08 am

Yeah I read that too, and I have noticed that the pickling lime I bought over a year ago is not quite as strong as I remember it being when I first got it, probably because it is starting to gradually turn into chalk. It just takes a little bit more of an addition to raise the pH but it is still very potent. I always remember to close the package I got it in after using some but I know it's still being exposed to air.

Slaked lime is the same thing as pickling lime, it's calcium hydroxide.

I estimate what the pH will be using the 'Bru'n Water' spreadsheet if it is a new recipe, if it is a recipe I have done before I know what the pH was from a previous brew day but I will still measure it anyway. I measure the pH of my mash prior to adding any salts, if the pH is low I will add a 1/4 tsp of pickling lime and measure the pH again after stirring it in for a few minutes, usually a single 1/4 tsp will raise it by several tenths of a point, I can then estimate how much more is needed to get it to about 5.4 at room temp. For a dark wort it can take more to raise the pH because of dark malts in the grist (I don't steep specialty malts I add them directly into the mash). For light worts the pH can raise quickly and I have to be careful to not go overboard with the additions. Martin's spreadsheet is good for estimating how much is needed to get in the ballpark pH.

Yes that is called lime softening, it is one way to soften water prior to using it to make beer but there are better ways nowadays (such as just using RO water and building up). I think it's interesting because this type of water softening has been around for a long time, so if you think about how brewers of old times may have been doing this type of water softening it can widen the realm of what you think is possible with a water profile. In Martin's spreadsheet there is a tab that lists famous brewing waters and there is information on what the profile is like if it's softened in this way.
Kegged: CAH (Cider + Agave + Honey)
Lagering: -
Conditioning: RIS (BA Abraxas 2.0),Quad/Saison
Fermenting: Oktoberfest, Lambic
Plan: -
rsc3da
 
Posts: 224
Joined: Mon Mar 19, 2012 8:36 pm
Location: St. Peters MO


Return to Recipes

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests